Indigenous Young People-Your Future and the Big Picture By Uncle Randy Woodley

As I look at the world that my generation is handing down to you…you, the first of the next seven generations and at your future, I grieve. But, I also see with this great challenge, great hope. I want to give you some advice to consider as you choose your fields of expertise and lifestyle. Our Mother Earth is in trouble…my generation has made it this way. If you don’t do something differently, you will continue the systemic evils that haunt our planet. While I cannot imagine the earth ceasing, I can imagine an earth surviving without humans. This would be tragic since it is our responsibility to maintain life’s harmony, but we have not done a good job of it. (Note: This applies directly to the US but Canada is not far behind).

young Indian boyIn my book, Shalom and the Community of Creation: An Indigenous Vision, I set out a simple thesis concerning how the earth is responding to our abuse and neglect. (This is a long quote but please read it):

Americans tend to be pragmatic people except when they are held captive to a false ideology. I wonder what it will take for us to hear the sound of the alarm going off in our world right now. I will leave it to the dozens of other books out there to explain the specifics of our impending disaster and only note that topsoil is disappearing…forest are shrinking…desertification is advancing…coral reefs are dying…plants, fish, insects, birds and animal species are all going extinct… and our fresh water sources are being depleted! Serious concerns exist at every level from local to global. Continue reading

Advertisements
Posted in Woodley | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Revenge of the Rickshaw Rally by Daniel Fan

In the summer of 2004, LifeWay Publishing released “Rickshaw Rally: Racing to the Son,” a vacation bible school curriculum that was saturated with stereotypical images of Asians, mixing of different cultural heritages, and in general, a heaping pile of racism with a little “Jesus” sprinkled on top.  When Asian American community members complained they were told that the offense was not intentional and furthermore: “this curriculum is really about preaching Jesus, and I wouldn’t want you to do anything that would stop Jesus from bring preached.”  Non-Asians Americans also voiced their frustration with Rickshaw Rally, but LifeWay brushed these objections aside.  Nearly ten years later, at the 2013 Mosaix Multi-Ethnic Church Conference LifeWay released this 1-1/2 minute apology for Rickshaw Rally:  http://vimeo.com/78735039

But this apology is not as simple as it sounds, nor is it necessarily a viable entrée into further dialog as some may have hoped… 

“You’re here because you know something…that there’s something wrong with the world. You don’t know what it is, but it’s there, like a splinter in your mind, driving you mad.” –Morpheus, played by Laurence Fishburne, “The Matrix” (1999)

Life is a story.  And how we tell that story says as much about us as it does about the world we are trying to describe. Continue reading

Posted in Daniel Fan | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Three Questions to ask of any Social Justice Narrative by Daniel Fan

Do you Do Do Justice?*

Has anyone ever pitched you a social justice initiative, and after the conclusion you thought “Something doesn’t feel right about this, but I don’t know what it is”? Maybe your instincts were right, but you couldn’t articulate exactly what was wrong? Yeah, I’ve been there too.

Justice is a potentially simple concept, but the transition from theory to practice can be extremely complicated and fraught with danger. It is entirely possible to enact injustice or oppression while attempting to do justice.

Here are three simple questions you can ask in order to quickly analyze any social justice pitch:

  • Whose story is being told?
  • Who is telling the story?
  • If they are different people or parties, why is one telling the other’s story? Continue reading
Posted in Daniel Fan | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

From the Postcolonial Peanut Gallery: Disney’s The Lone Ranger and the Disappearing Indian by Daniel Fan

A second pillar of white supremacy is the logic of genocide. This logic holds that indigenous peoples must disappear. In fact, they must always be disappearing, in order to allow non-indigenous peoples rightful claim over this land. Through this logic of genocide, non-Native peoples then become the rightful inheritors of all that was indigenous-land, resources, indigenous spirituality, or culture.
–Andrea Smith (“Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy” from The Color of Violence)

The Lone Ranger MovieI had seen enough from the previews to think I wasn’t going to like Disney’s The Lone Ranger, but I wanted to actually view the film before judging it. 

The Lone Ranger opens with a young turn-of-the-century white boy, dressed in a Lone Ranger costume, attending a carnival in San Francisco that includes a quasi-historical display of what can only be described as the conquered west.  The boy passes displays of a buffalo, a grizzly bear, and finally “The Noble Savage,” a wax-like figurine who turns out to be none other than Tonto, or “THE Tonto!?!” as the amazed white boy exclaims.

Tonto expresses himself in the classic incorrect-personal pronoun Indian speak.  There is no way that a Lone Ranger film could have been made without a shout-out to the 1930s radio series that first introduced/fabricated Tonto’s distinct style of speech.  But unlike other iconic and even idiosyncratic speaking styles, e.g. Star War’s Yoda, Tonto actually represents a real ethnicity.  As Randy Woodley, Keetoowah Cherokee (legal descendant) observed, Tonto’s speech demonstrates a paternalistic white view of Native Americans in the same way that “me love you long time” stands in for Asians/Asian Americans.  Disney could have easily dealt with the nostalgic aspects of the series and legitimate native concerns by having the Tonto character address the Lone Ranger directly “You think all Indian talk like this? We don’t and we never have” and continue with normal dialogue (a confrontation that actually happened in the 1980s Lone Ranger comics).  Continue reading

Posted in Daniel Fan, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Life of the Land is Lost in Translation by Daniel Fan

hawaii-flag2 copyOn January 16, 1893, 162 American sailors and Marines sallied forth from the USS Boston and took up positions around American installations in Honolulu.  Without firing a shot, this intervention changed the history of the Hawaiian people forever. 

In the months prior to the January 16th invasion, monarch Queen Lili’uokolani sought to amend the Hawaiian Constitution in an effort to restore native rights and sovereignty.  Six years earlier, her brother and predecessor, David Kalakaua, was forced by what amounted to a white settler aristocracy into signing the “Bayonet Constitution” which stripped the monarchy of its powers, installed a white-led legislature and disenfranchised natives, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos and pretty much anyone who wasn’t white.  Queen Lili’uokolani’s proposed reforms had broad public support from the majority of Hawaiian citizens, except for those in the Euro-American landed “Reform Party” (a.k.a. Missionary Party”). 

Alarmed by overwhelming evidence of an imminent coup attempt against the Queen, the Royal Guard assembled, with a final count of slightly less than 500 volunteers and Hawaiian regulars.  They were opposed by 1,500 “Honolulu Rifles,” white militiamen who owed their allegiance to the now insurgent Reform Party.

Sensing the danger of open, armed conflict in the city streets with not only the Honolulu Rifles, but also the US military, Queen Lili’uokolani ordered Hawaiian forces to stand down and voluntarily abdicated her throne:  Continue reading

Posted in Daniel Fan | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

E. Rios Montt and the US/Christian Culpability by Randy Woodley

A few days ago, former President of Guatemala Rios Montt was FINALLY convicted of genocide against Indigenous Mayan villages, land “needed” for development. Now, we in the US have culpability as well.

The Reagan administration should face charges of being accomplices to crimes against humanity. Reagan helped Montt in his genocide on many different levels including propaganda and cover up. The US trained military leaders, and the US & Israel supplied all the arms which were used to murder untold thousands of innocent people in the most gruesome ways including rape, strangling, cutting babies out of pregnant women, making whole villages dig their own mass graves, etc (sound familiar?).

Beyond this, I call for all Evangelical radio and television talk show hosts from the 1980s who both interviewed, defended and lauded Montt as a “born again” Christian in order to push the conservative economic (Reganomics) agenda, to repent publicly and attempt to make restitution to the families of the Guatemalan survivors. Otherwise, you continue to misrepresent Christ and as Paul says, “crucify him anew!” You Christian talk show hosts should show integrity and show your repentance so we can learn from our mistakes and help restore the villages and families who have lived through hell.

I remember well as a young radio announcer at KRKS in Denver broadcasting the programs who pushed Montt’s faith in Christ and the fight against non-capitalistic economic ideologies as if capitalism was somehow a prerequisite of Christianity.

Finally, I ask, what atrocities are we currently contributing to and covering up? We need to look at war, power, trade agreements and see what is really going on. Can we keep our heads buried in the sand and not be held accountable? I don’t think so. What true follower of Christ would want to?

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Farewell, Uncle Richard

Richard TwissIn Heaven
a circle of grass

Tread down
by the prayers of dancers.

Around it
A ring of drums
the smell of burning sage.

A light breeze and a warm sun.

“And now
We’re gonna sing an honor song
For our Brother Richard Twiss.”

The sound of
drums and voices lifted up.

Can you hear them Richard?

The saints sing to honor you.

Dancers enter,
clothed in buckskin and feathers,
Beads and shells.

Leading them all is one whose hands and feet are pierced.
the grass sprouts through his soles,
the sun shines through his palms.

Can you see him Richard?

The Son of God dances to honor you
and welcomes you home.

You stood with your people
And now you dance with our Creator.

I will miss you Richard.

My brother.

My uncle.

My chief.

My friend.


by Daniel Fan

Posted in Daniel Fan | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments